Rise of Nations. Fit for the Classroom?

This week our Tech Task in my ECMP335 class was to find and play an educational game and write a short review about it.  I have always been a fan of RTS (real-time strategy) games, and thought that the historical context of Rise of Nations may make it suitable for classroom use.  The game itself is quite similar to the Civilizations franchise in that it allows you to start with a small group of nomadic people and slowly grow their colony into multiple cities, eventually advancing to the Information Age. The game includes historical information the the Wonder’s of the World and asks the players to find a balance between developing your economy, your military, and expanding the size of your nation.

While very entertaining and engaging, I found that I would not have noticed the connections to the historical world had I not been specifically looking for them.   While I feel that educational games (or games that include educational elements like Civilizations or Rise of Nations) can be used to teach while at the same time creating an exciting engaging environment, I don’t believe that this translates well into the classroom.  I think as a future educator I will need to look at everything I do with a critical lens and examine the best ways to teach.  I don’t think technology should be used simply because it is the ‘next greatest thing’ or that it will ‘make teaching easier’ but instead should be viewed as another tool.   A tool that needs to be used in a calculated way to maximize its affect on students.

As a teacher, I always want to be doing the best thing for my students and if I am being honest, I don’t think that games like Rise of Nations facilitate a deeper learning than researching a textbook. That said, I know different people learn differently, but I feel that a game like this is something that would teach students, but one that should be played in the home instead of some other games.  I also think that as educators, we need to look at what games are doing correctly that engages participants so deeply.  By understanding those elements, perhaps we will be able to create lessons that spur the same connection and ultimately, deeper learning and understanding.

More to ponder I suppose.

D.

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